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20120920
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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> a throughou these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internal among the ung pele and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief in beirut
and millions of their citizens want to build futures in the united states. there's no argument from me there on american exceptionalism, but you argue it's not our ideals that make us exceptional. what do you mean by that? >> i do think so some extent it's our ideals. arabs express tremendous admiration for our ideals and principles and institution of our government. they're outraged by the gap that they perceive between the pay in which we live here in the united states and our conduct in their part of the world. all that being said, we're left with the situation in the middle east right now where no other country has the capacity to do the kinds of things that the united states can do. no other country has the capacity to help the arab world in the ways that the united states can help the arab world, and that's why you still see people like president mohamed morsi, the first civilian elected islamic president of egypt. the muslim brotherhood has a long history of being opposed to the u.s. relations but seeking debt relief and help from the imf. other countries look to the united stat
's been lacking. it's embarrassing to me for the nearly years i have been a member of the united states national not to see that leadership exhibited in the united states of america. thank you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, this week my home state of mississippi received the sobering news that our economy had slipped back into recession. frankly, i'm concerned that my state may be a harbinger for the rest of the country. despite national efforts to create new jobs and opportunities, our economy is not getting significantly bett better. it is a problem, we think. in most states unemployment has remained over 8% for more than three years despite spending nearly $1 trillion with the president's 2009 stimulus package. investments in small business growth have languished, and they've done this in a state of the economy, tax policy, federal regulations that seem to have made matters worse. the course we're on is simply not good enough. we hope and we urge the senate to make a strong stand. let's get to
of our ambassador being killed. are we better off now. >> is this good for the united states? is this good for the arab people. >> eliot: just to stop you, that is a fundamental question that we don't often stop to ask that question. who is we? >> we tend to think if it's bad for us it must be bad for them. we don't stop and think that something bad for us might be good for them. in the long run the middle east is to have legitimate stable government. stable democratic government. that's good for them. in the short one it's quite possible while it's still good for the arab world, it will be bad for us. why? because when you replace bought and paid for dictators like we had before who could be counted on to share america's sense-- >> eliot: mu barrack. >> when her you replace that with a democratic government, which is responsive to its people and you have a population which is fairly heavily anti-american, it's going to look pretty anti-america. is that bad for arab peoples in egypt libya yemen and elsewhere? >> eliot: syria. >> we don't know, and the answer is no. but is it
/11 in the united states -- was that your testimony? >> is a daunting statistics. i got this information of a steve emerson's investigative product website, where he has all the court records of every single muslim are extremists arrested in the country since 9/11. that is my sources can pump. -- that is where my sources came from. >> many people in the community did not understand to sikhs -- who they were intel the tragedy occurred. how does the sikh fit into milwaukee before the tragedy, and how would you describe the outpouring corresponds that occurred? >> sikhs are a different religion, a different race -- they will come up to you and asking for you are. people do not ask towho sikhs are. if a person asks me, who am i? what is that on your head? i would love to tell them what it is. people do not do that. they should start doing that. to get the fact that it is right. it is a turban. >> ok. how have you been moving forward since the tragedy with respect to your place of worship and your ability to come and worship without fear? >> on my what? >> the level of fear that occurred when the traged
to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 20, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i would yield to my friend from delaware and ask that i be recognized when he finishes his remarks. the presiding officer: the senator from delaware. mr. coons: thank you very much, mr. president. i rise today to express my gratitude to leader reid, to chaplain black, to all of us in the chamber and my gratitude to the reverent dr. dug gerdts. it is my honor and privilege to welcome him to our chamber this morning as one of delaware's finest leaders. reverend gerdts leads the congregation at first and centr
of residents, the united states agreed the tilt rotor aircraft will not be flown below 150 meters or over densely populated areas. after the test flights, the u.s. military plans to transfer the osprey to okinawa by the end of the month. the u.s. hopes to have the aircraft in full operation by mid october. many residents remain angry about the planned deployment. defense minister will visit okinawa next week to meet with the governor and other officials. he will explain the government did all it could to guarantee the safety of the ospreys. but the governor is still skeptical. >> translator: the central government its not addressing our concerns properly. >> he said the government lacks sincerity in the handling of the matter. >> all rigaw >> the united states has imposed sanctions to a firm in belarus for providing arms to syria. the company contributing to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. the officials say the firm provided parts for aerial bombs syrian forces used against rebels. the treasury department will freeze the assets in the u.s. and ban the firm from dealing w
the united states ambassador to libya and three other americans. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> with only 47 days to go until the election, the romney campaign's about to roll out another new strategy. voters will be seeing a lot more of mitt romney. in fact, we're only minutes away from his speech at a rally in florida. our national political correspondent jim acosta is joining us now live from sarasota to set the scene. jim, what's going on? >> reporter: wolf, we expect mitt romney to be out here in sarasota, florida, in just a few minutes from now. this is where his advisors say after a relatively light schedule over the last couple weeks, mitt romney and his campaign will be picking up the pace. and after seeming to defend those comments on that hidden camera video on government dependency, romney appears to be shifting again on that message as well looking for something that will stick. after being caught on tape writing off 47% of voters as obama supporters who are dependent on government, mitt romney was checking his math at a candidate's forum with the spanish
consequences, even jail time, improperly cast ballots are virtually nonexistent in the united states. there are far more votes that are lost due to malfunctioning mistakes and sleight of hand by local officials that are inept or cheating than all of the cases that have been documented nationwide. in texas, for example, there is another effort to pass aggressive voter i.d. legislation, they could find only five documented incidents of voter fraud in 13 million ballots cast in the last two elections. in pennsylvania, there have been fewer than you can count on your fingers and up to a million people may be denied the right to vote because of these legal changes. millions of poor, elderly, minority and student voters don't have passports, driver's license. some don't even have birth certificates. they may face the modern version of a poll tax and that's unconscionable. the median courts are pushing back on some of the more outrageous behavior like ohio secretary of state who was called out and forced to back down after he tried to limit early voting in counties with democrats in the maj
is that the makers of this anti-islam film in the united states be punished, or the u.s. government take some retaliatory action. we've heard from the organizer of this march here in egypt for him to be tried with sharia law meaning he could be executed for insulting the prophet muhammad. it is very difficult in this part of the world where putting anything on the internet is so controlled, speech is so controlled, you can be imprisoned for insutting us -- insulting islam. very difficult to explain in the united states we live in a democracy, and the government can't just go around punishing people no matter how horrible what they say is on the internet. megyn? megyn: leland vittert, thank you. >>> there are new questions today about the protests against america and the billions in foreign aid we send to countries like pakistan, libya and egypt. pakistan, where the u.s. embassy is under siege right now, got $2.1 billion from american taxpayers this year. libya, where four americans were murdered at the consulate in benghazi last week gets a little over $13 million in financial assistance, and
. and rehabilitation programs the world over, including in the united states, often fail. the hope is that you the get one or two of these guys out of a whole host of them actually not to return to the battlefield. that's something of a win. but the united states has recognized this policy of repatriating them, that they may return to the battlefield. >> fran, you were just there. you were a close friend of ambassador stevens. did he ever say anything to you like we're hearing in these reports, that he believed he was on an al qaeda hit list. he was very concerned about the deteriorating security situation in benghazi? >> you know, it was august 29th, that morning ambassador stevens and i had breakfast together. we had a whole conversation because i expressed concern about the growing rise in michigans in tripoli. -- militias in tripoli. the growing number east of benghazi, growing in numbers and their arms capability there. he was clearly concerned about that. but he suggested to me at some point to go to benghazi, to see for myself. so i think he understood very well the increasing concern about ext
-term because people still consider the united states the safest and greatest country on earth, rightfully so. it is a problem long-term and even medium term. gerri: the number the president was trying to find, 16 trillion. he says it doesn't matter. does that matter to the american people? >> on the former, the question was ambiguous enough the president to not have known what he was talking about although we did not ask for a clarification. on this question if there are short-term problems with our debt, that is an incredible thing for the president of the united states to say when we are accumulating $4 billion per day on debt, just interest on the debt, that is a very serious short-term damage to the country, to the economy, what have you and for the president of the united states to pretend that doesn't matter, not even talking about the fact we were just downgraded again by another ratings agency, just talking about the sheer numbers on our debt on a daily basis, that is a short-term problem in a short-term catastrophe. gerri: here is the president. >> i think the trick is figuring out
the stories with media matters and there is a trail that the department of justice that the united states of america has been colluding with a far left attack dog. that is just nuts. >> gretchen: here is a quick look. hi, i am working on debunking a conservative myth of operation fast and furuous and hoping it would help it out. >> they are tax exempt and that means they are a-political. other than >> steve: so is the department of justice. that's why it is important to the taxpayer and viewer out there. and members of congress are calling for this woman to resign because of the alleged collusion between the departments. >> brian: how many things can pull off on eric holder's resume to examine what he is doing over fast and furious and communication with medias. i understand in congress there is a movement to reexempt media -- look at media matters as tax exempt. >> steve: they are trying to make us look bad and members of congress look bad and people who work in the department of justice look bad? does that sound like justice? i don't think so. >> brian: fox news is continuing to investi
's a shock to me, as someone who emigrated to united states many years ago, it's shocking, the bureaucracy is so thick, so huge, i'm astonished-- >> it's amazing, one of the things that's holding people back. you talk about the fact that the unemployment rah it is not markedly getting better, on the contrary it's getting worse, especially frustrated workers. those who are vulnerable, and something interesting in the past in america, unlike other countries, when people become chronically unemployed in the bottom half of the income distribution when they tend to turn towards our own ideas for creating businesses-- you see an explosion of low income entrepreneurship, after about nine months of the income-- out of the income stream and the employment force. it's not happening this time and we have to ask ourselves, what's going on. and there is an answer, and the policy uncertainty to be sure, but more to the point, it's harder and harder to get out from behind this bureaucracy, to start a business and that's especially true, if somebody doesn't have a brother-in-law who is a consultant and so
states, looking to the united states for leadership. they are not seeing it. >>neil: do we give them more money in why good money after bad? if we cannot buy their love with the billions we have given why put a deposit on their hate? ing it is not to buy their love. the point of remark i have made, that you refer to, are the fact that our aid doesn't come because someone is entitled. it comes if our allies there are going to stand with us and stand for the thing we believe in. >>neil: but lately they vicinity. it puts well expended people like yourself in a box. what do you do? >>guest: the question is, especially when you look at the government of egypt, the muslim brotherhood, obtaining power there, that is a very troublesome development. that's where i think the united states and our foreign policy will have to take heed whether that government is going to recognize u.s. interests, will recognize the fact that we believe the best route forward is for egypt to recognize its agreement and peace treaty with our ally, israel, can we stand up against extremism. we have to stand up against i
did in february, we will not let china to continue to steal jobs from the united states of america. >> he is really in a position -- if i can put the tape and some of this into a larger context, which will allow me also to pitch my book, what is interesting to watch play out from my perspective is my book looks at how the white house, barack obama, responded to the drumming democrats took in a member 2010. it gets over the tax bill, don't ask, don't tell, egypt, libya, all of these things that happened in year-and-a-half after november 2010. one overarching theme is the president, whether you agree or disagree with some of his policy actions in that frame of time, saw the tea party, in and believed it would go too far. and the way he could set up a narrative for the 2012 election that would be beneficial to him and democrats was to set this up as a contest of values. to throwparty would be ticke people off the social safety programs that would privatize medicare and say, you're on your own. while he would make the case, as he did, to the budget cut fights, debt ceiling fights, and
that said that people who served in our military could be permanent residents of the united states. >> he did say what he wouldn't do, but he wouldn't specify what he would do to solve the immigration problem in the country. still a lot of questions for his voters there. >> he tried to make light or at least show that he, you know, has some humor that, he knows how to make light of kind of an awkward movement -- moment. did that translate? did it work? >> well, it's funny when you think about it. his father was born in mexico in the state of chau wau wau. he has distanced himself from that part of his heritage, and that can be a two-way street because on the one hand it could have helped with latino voters, but, on the other hand, it would have been compromising when it comes to the conservative base of the republican party. let's see how he handled it. >> are you sure you're not hispanic? >>ty think that might have helped me here at the university of miami. as you know, my dad was born of american parents living in mexico, but he came back to this country at age 5 or 6 and was -- he reco
will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. >> narrator: guardian reporter ghaith abdul-ahad's journey into syria began five weeks ago on a supply route the rebels use to bring weapons from neighboring turkey. >> this is all liberated territory at the moment. >> narrator: the rebels are fighting to overthrow president bashar
in the united states early next year to sell out concerts in washington's kennedy center and new york's carnigy hall. >> we want the people of the world to see there are afghan girls and boys performing side-by-side. that means to a certain extent that we've won and that really afghanistan has won. ♪ >> reporter: as this country
a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. it's got that sweet honey taste. but no way it's 80 calories, right? no way, right? lady, i just drive the truck. right, there's no way right, right? have a nice day. [ male announcer ] 80 delicious calories. fiber one. >>> a cnn exclusive. what chris stevens knew about threats to his life before the attack that killed him. >>> 14 officials singled out in the fast and furious report but no blame for the attorney general. >>> mitt romney now talking about the 100% as he tries to court latino voters. >>> welcome back to "early start," everyone. >> very happy that you're with us this morning. we're going to begin this morning with new details in the attack on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. u.s. officials saying it was a case of terrorism. that attack killed four americ
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)